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Veneers vs. Dental Bonding: What's the Difference?

Are you confused about the difference between veneers and dental bonding? Here's everything you need to know about the two dental options.

Veneers vs. Dental Bonding: What's the Difference?

Veneers vs. Dental Bonding: What's the Difference?

Veneers vs. Dental Bonding: What's the Difference?
Veneers vs. Dental Bonding: What's the Difference?

Did you know that a healthy smile is foundational to helping us look and feel our best? With all the advancements in modern dentistry, though, the options for achieving a healthy smile can seem overwhelming.

Two of the most popular options, veneers, and dental bonding, can seem especially similar. But, there are a few differences you should know before deciding which one is right for your situation.

In this guide, we'll explore these two options and help you figure out which one is appropriate for you. We'll also clue you in on how to get the best possible care from your Delaware, Ohio family dentist.

What are Dental Veneers? 

Dental veneers are also called porcelain veneers. Essentially, a veneer is a thin piece of porcelain material that is placed over your teeth. 

Your local dentist will design your veneers to fit perfectly over your teeth. This creates a natural look so that your veneer is indistinguishable from the rest of your smile.

Veneers can help to solve several different problems, including:

  • Discolored teeth
  • Hiding chipped or otherwise injured teeth
  • Create a more uniform smile.

You can get either a single veneer or multiple, depending on your smile goals.

When placing a veneer, your dentist will shave off or remove some of the existing tooth. This allows the veneer to sit snugly on the tooth, creating a smooth appearance. 

Getting veneers is usually a relatively painless process. However, it may require several visits to your family dentistry practice. These visits and consultations help to ensure your veneers look absolutely perfect.

What is Dental Bonding?

Dental bonding, or teeth bonding, is a bit different from veneers. Dental bonding involves having the bonding resin applied directly to the tooth, instead of being a pre-formed porcelain piece.

After the resin is applied, your restorative dentistry professional will wait for it to harden. Once the resin has hardened, your dentist will shape and polish it to achieve a natural look.

Dental bonding does not last as long as veneers. It will begin to fade or chip over time. Generally, your Delaware, Ohio dentist will recommend dental bonding for minor tooth imperfections. 

Usually, dental bonding is done on the front teeth, but not all front teeth are good candidates for dental bonding.. Other teeth that require exceptional bite force, such as the molars, are bad candidates for cosmetic dental bonding.

Tooth bonding that has been appropriately cared for will usually last anywhere from 3 years to 10 years. The procedure is often completed in a single visit, as it is a relatively simple one.

Comparing the Cost: Dental Bonding vs Veneers

Advanced dentistry comes in a wide range of prices depending on your preferred procedure and the level of care required.

The cost of veneers is usually a bit higher than the average dental bonding cost. This is because veneers are made from porcelain, while dental bonding comes from simple resin. 

However, dental veneers often last much longer than dental bonding. If you have a more serious problem with your teeth, opting for veneers will likely save you more money in the long run.

Veneers are better for covering stains, while dental bonding is ideal for fixing chips or gaps in the teeth. However, dental bonding is not a great option for the front teeth or any teeth that incur heavy bite force. They can easily become cracked or broken in these areas.

Considering Appearance and Durability

Dental bonding and dental veneers are both designed to blend in naturally with the rest of your smile. However, dental bonding doesn't do well against stains, and will often become darker over time.

Veneers, on the other hand, are relatively stain-resistant. They will generally maintain their white appearance as long as they are being appropriately cared for.

If you're looking for a long-term solution, dental veneers are the way to go. Where tooth bonding will only last about 3 to 10 years, veneers can last anywhere from 10 to 25 years.

Neither option is invincible, and neither option will last forever. However, porcelain is much stronger than resin. This means veneers are generally chip-resistant. 

However, resin is still quite a strong material. For chips and cracks, your dentist can mold dental bonding to the teeth, making for a much easier, quicker solution. 

How to Choose Between Bonding and Veneers

One of the biggest considerations when it comes to choosing between bonding and veneers is your ultimate goal. What do you want to achieve with your cosmetic procedure?

In some cases, a combination of both bonding and veneers is the most appropriate option. For example, you may have chipped your four front teeth. Veneers may be the better choice for the front two, but bonding might work better for the others. 

If your goal is simply to have whiter teeth, try a professional tooth whitening before you opt for a full veneer procedure. In many cases, this can be just as effective, while saving you time and money. 

However, if tooth whitening does not help you achieve the desired results, veneers can be a great, long-term solution.

Your Delaware, Ohio dentist can help you with other problems, as well. This includes things like TMJ and sleep apnea. Be sure to discuss all concerns you may have when you come in for your next visit!

Advanced Dentistry When You Need It

As you can see, dental bonding and dental veneers do have quite a few similarities. However, their differences are key when it comes to determining which solution is best for your situation. Focus on reviewing your budget and goals and don't be afraid to consult with your local Delaware, Ohio dentist.

To talk to our team of qualified professionals, schedule an appointment. We can help you with a variety of different issues, from veneers and dental bonding to treatment for sleep apnea. Whatever your needs, we've got you covered.

Did you know that a healthy smile is foundational to helping us look and feel our best? With all the advancements in modern dentistry, though, the options for achieving a healthy smile can seem overwhelming.

Two of the most popular options, veneers, and dental bonding, can seem especially similar. But, there are a few differences you should know before deciding which one is right for your situation.

In this guide, we'll explore these two options and help you figure out which one is appropriate for you. We'll also clue you in on how to get the best possible care from your Delaware, Ohio family dentist.

What are Dental Veneers? 

Dental veneers are also called porcelain veneers. Essentially, a veneer is a thin piece of porcelain material that is placed over your teeth. 

Your local dentist will design your veneers to fit perfectly over your teeth. This creates a natural look so that your veneer is indistinguishable from the rest of your smile.

Veneers can help to solve several different problems, including:

  • Discolored teeth
  • Hiding chipped or otherwise injured teeth
  • Create a more uniform smile.

You can get either a single veneer or multiple, depending on your smile goals.

When placing a veneer, your dentist will shave off or remove some of the existing tooth. This allows the veneer to sit snugly on the tooth, creating a smooth appearance. 

Getting veneers is usually a relatively painless process. However, it may require several visits to your family dentistry practice. These visits and consultations help to ensure your veneers look absolutely perfect.

What is Dental Bonding?

Dental bonding, or teeth bonding, is a bit different from veneers. Dental bonding involves having the bonding resin applied directly to the tooth, instead of being a pre-formed porcelain piece.

After the resin is applied, your restorative dentistry professional will wait for it to harden. Once the resin has hardened, your dentist will shape and polish it to achieve a natural look.

Dental bonding does not last as long as veneers. It will begin to fade or chip over time. Generally, your Delaware, Ohio dentist will recommend dental bonding for minor tooth imperfections. 

Usually, dental bonding is done on the front teeth, but not all front teeth are good candidates for dental bonding.. Other teeth that require exceptional bite force, such as the molars, are bad candidates for cosmetic dental bonding.

Tooth bonding that has been appropriately cared for will usually last anywhere from 3 years to 10 years. The procedure is often completed in a single visit, as it is a relatively simple one.

Comparing the Cost: Dental Bonding vs Veneers

Advanced dentistry comes in a wide range of prices depending on your preferred procedure and the level of care required.

The cost of veneers is usually a bit higher than the average dental bonding cost. This is because veneers are made from porcelain, while dental bonding comes from simple resin. 

However, dental veneers often last much longer than dental bonding. If you have a more serious problem with your teeth, opting for veneers will likely save you more money in the long run.

Veneers are better for covering stains, while dental bonding is ideal for fixing chips or gaps in the teeth. However, dental bonding is not a great option for the front teeth or any teeth that incur heavy bite force. They can easily become cracked or broken in these areas.

Considering Appearance and Durability

Dental bonding and dental veneers are both designed to blend in naturally with the rest of your smile. However, dental bonding doesn't do well against stains, and will often become darker over time.

Veneers, on the other hand, are relatively stain-resistant. They will generally maintain their white appearance as long as they are being appropriately cared for.

If you're looking for a long-term solution, dental veneers are the way to go. Where tooth bonding will only last about 3 to 10 years, veneers can last anywhere from 10 to 25 years.

Neither option is invincible, and neither option will last forever. However, porcelain is much stronger than resin. This means veneers are generally chip-resistant. 

However, resin is still quite a strong material. For chips and cracks, your dentist can mold dental bonding to the teeth, making for a much easier, quicker solution. 

How to Choose Between Bonding and Veneers

One of the biggest considerations when it comes to choosing between bonding and veneers is your ultimate goal. What do you want to achieve with your cosmetic procedure?

In some cases, a combination of both bonding and veneers is the most appropriate option. For example, you may have chipped your four front teeth. Veneers may be the better choice for the front two, but bonding might work better for the others. 

If your goal is simply to have whiter teeth, try a professional tooth whitening before you opt for a full veneer procedure. In many cases, this can be just as effective, while saving you time and money. 

However, if tooth whitening does not help you achieve the desired results, veneers can be a great, long-term solution.

Your Delaware, Ohio dentist can help you with other problems, as well. This includes things like TMJ and sleep apnea. Be sure to discuss all concerns you may have when you come in for your next visit!

Advanced Dentistry When You Need It

As you can see, dental bonding and dental veneers do have quite a few similarities. However, their differences are key when it comes to determining which solution is best for your situation. Focus on reviewing your budget and goals and don't be afraid to consult with your local Delaware, Ohio dentist.

To talk to our team of qualified professionals, schedule an appointment. We can help you with a variety of different issues, from veneers and dental bonding to treatment for sleep apnea. Whatever your needs, we've got you covered.

Veneers vs. Dental Bonding: What's the Difference?

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